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Tag Archives | bronze age

The Lisdrumturk Cauldron

Discovered in 1854, by turf-cutters digging in a Co. Monaghan bog, the Lisdrumturk Cauldron is an exceptional example of Late Bronze Age metal-working. It was undoubtedly a high status object and its burial in a bog may be indicative of ritual activity. Finally crafted, the cauldron measures 29.5cm high by 50cm in diameter. It is made from […]

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The enigmatic fulacht fiadh or burnt mound

Burnt mounds are a type of archaeological site whose defining characteristic is large quantities of heat shattered stone. These sites commonly date to the Bronze Age, although examples from the Neolithic through to the medieval period are known. Burnt mounds are also known as fulacht fiadh and have been primarily interpreted as cooking places. The […]

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Facing the past. An anthropomorphic Bronze Age pot from Cork

  An exceptional collection of Bronze Age artefacts was recently found near Mitchelstown in County Cork (Kiely & Sutton 2007). They included a ceramic spoon and three pottery vessels, two of which had distinctly anthropomorphic features. These remarkable finds were recovered from a small pit during an archaeological  excavation carried out by Bruce Sutton of […]

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cereal drying kiln

Irish corn-drying kilns, their Bronze Age origins?

A number of recent archaeological excavations have shed light on the possible ancient origins of corn-drying kilns in Ireland. These structures played an important role in cereal production, especially in damp climates such as Ireland where they were used to remove moisture prior to storage as well as to harden cereals to facilitate threshing and […]

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Mystery artefact sheds new light on Irish Bronze Age weaving

An unusual prehistoric artefact was recovered during the archaeological excavation of one of a pair of Middle Bronze Age structures identified at Knockgraffon, Co. Tipperary (along the N8 Cashel to Mitchelstown Road scheme, see McQuade, Molloy & Moriarty 2009). Each of the structures was defined by a circle of postholes and internally contained a large […]

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fish weir

Dublin, The Prehistoric City

  When we think about the archaeology of Dublin the first things that comes to mind are the extensive Viking remains uncovered at sites such Woodquay/Fishamble Street and Temple Bar as well as the deep deposits of medieval archaeological remains that are found across much of the city centre. However, recently excavations at number of […]

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Halberds and Crane dances, a new theory.

  Just after reading a very interesting article in the latest issue of Archaeology Ireland (Spring 2011). The article discusses how the crane, a large and colourful bird which is related to the heron, was once very common in Ireland, only becoming extinct c. 300 years ago. The authors, Lorcan O’ Toole and Ronan O’ Flaherty, suggest that this impressive […]

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Bronze Age dugout canoe, circa 2200 BC

  A history of Ireland in 100 objects Bronze Age dugout canoe by Fintan O’Toole (taken from the Irish Times Link) It is so long – 15m in all – that it cannot be photographed as a whole inside the National Museum of Ireland. The best image goes back to 1902, when it was taken in […]

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