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Early Medieval Tunnel/Souterrain discovered in Co. Kerry

Interesting news from Co. Kerry, where an early medieval tunnel system/souterrain has been uncovered during construction works along the N71 road between Bonane and Glengarrif. Located in Releagh townland, the previously unrecorded tunnel system is cut into the underlying boulder clay/bedrock and contains two internal chambers, which measure circa 4m wide. Also known as souterrains, […]

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Project to accurately date Early Irish Texts wins funding

Funding of €1.8 million by has been secured from the European Research Council  for a project that will date a large number of 7th–10th century Irish texts. Professor Stifter, Head of Maynooth University Department of Early Irish, will lead a team of five researchers on the project known as Chronologicon Hibernicum. This will develop and use innovative methodologies and […]

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Weather Beaten Archaeology: IT Sligo to host new Archaeology Conference

New archaeological sites, uncovered during the winter storms of the last two years, will be the subject of a special international conference in IT Sligo next weekend. The inaugural Weather Beaten Archaeology Conference is being hosted by the Institute’s Department of Environmental Science. It will run over two days: Saturday March 7th and Sunday March […]

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New foundation aims to preserve Irish folklore heritage

The National Folklore Foundation (Fondúireacht Bhéaloideas Éireann), a new UCD company with charitable status, has been set up to preserve, protect and promote Ireland’s National Folklore Collection at University College Dublin. The Collection is one of the largest folklore collections in the world. It is composed of circa 3 million manuscript pages, 500,000 index cards, 12,000 […]

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Site of famous 19th century ‘shipwreck’ discovered in Dundrum Bay, Co. Down

  Archaeologists have located the exact position where a famous 19th century ship, the ss Great Britain, was grounded for nearly a year in 1846. Designed by Isambard Kingdom Brunel, the ss Great Britain was then the longest passenger ship in the world  and its grounding made international headlines. The incident, which was the result […]

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Ireland’s Ancient Dairy Past Revealed

New research from the University of Bristol has revealed the antiquity of dairy farming in Ireland. Research published today in the Journal of Environmental Archaeology shows that dairying on the island goes back approximately 6,000 years, revealed through traces of ancient dairy fats found in pots dating to around 4,000 to 2,500 BC. Dr Jessica Smyth […]

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Five-thousand-year-old footprints found in Denmark

Exciting news from Denmark: archaeologists working on the Fehmarn Belt Tunnel scheme, have uncovered evidence for 5,000-year-old human footprints (source Museum Lolland-Falster). The footprints were identified along the edge of an ancient post-and-wattle fish-trap, which was built in an area of coastline that had formerly been occupied by a series of inlets and rivers. At […]

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Rocking through the Ages

This week’s Friday fun contains a selection of images of famous musicians hanging out at archaeological sites. Hope you enjoy them! 1. A  1961 New York Times photo, showing Louis Armstrong playing trumpet for his wife, Lucille, in front of the Great Sphinx and pyramids in Giza, Egypt.    2. A very young looking U2 […]

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