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Archive | Irish archaeology blog posts

Archive of Irish Archaeology.ie blog posts

Remarkable Old Photos of Ireland

This wonderful selection of photographs illustrates Ireland at the very start of the 20th century. Concentrated in Co. Galway, the images depict thatched cottages, shawl clad women, small farms and barefoot children. Indeed, the poverty shown in some of the photos is striking. All of the pictures are taken from the United States Library of Congress […]

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Heritage Council Announces Community Grants Programme

The Heritage Council have just announced that this year it will run a €500,000 community grants scheme as well as supporting 70 full time jobs. Maintaining the community grants initiative has been made possible by the provision of a supplementary estimate of €500,000 by the Minister for Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht, Ms. Heather Humphreys in […]

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‘You Moulting Desert Ram’: 12 Early Irish Insults

This colourful collection of Irish insults dates from the Early Medieval era and is primarily based on the period’s satirical poetry and prose. The insults are sourced from the electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language  which in this instance relies heavily on Róisín McLaughlin’s ‘Early Irish Satire‘. 1 ‘you moulting desert ram‘ (a reithi folta fasaigh ar fiadh) […]

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Treasure into ashes: A 19th century cist burial discovery

I recently came across an interesting 19th century account describing the discovery of a Bronze Age cist burial at Mullaun, Co. Wexford. Written by George Henry Kinahan, a geologist with the Geological Survey, it gives a valuable insight into the folklore and superstitions surrounding these early archaeological discoveries. His description reads: ‘Here some years ago […]

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Below the Surface Presents: Piracy and Predation in early 17th century Ireland

‘Below the Surface’ are hosting a series of maritime talks in a very unique venue – The Jeanie Johnston tall ship. This replica famine ship is currently docked on the Dublin quays and the creaking sounds of it’s wooden hull will undoubtedly create a very atmospheric location for the lecture series. The talks will deal with a variety of subjects […]

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The enigmatic fulacht fiadh or burnt mound

Burnt mounds are a type of archaeological site whose defining characteristic is large quantities of heat shattered stone. These sites commonly date to the Bronze Age, although examples from the Neolithic through to the medieval period are known. Burnt mounds are also known as fulacht fiadh and have been primarily interpreted as cooking places. The […]

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